The Snow Baby: The Arctic Childhood of Admiral Robert E. Peary’s Daring Daughter

The Snow Baby: The Arctic Childhood of Admiral Robert E. Peary’s Daring Daughter

The Snow Baby: The Arctic Childhood of Admiral Robert E. Peary’s Daring Daughter

Holiday House
Ages 10 and up

Booklist Editors’ Choice Book
A Booklist Top Ten Biography for Youth
James Madison Award Honor Book
Orbis Pictus Award Recommended Title
Cooperative Children’s Book Center Choice Book

“When Marie Peary, daughter of the famous explorer, was six weeks old, her mother wrapped her in a caribou skin bag, furs, and an American flag and carried her outside to see the sunlight shine on the Greenland snow. Soon the sun would disappear for months. Young Marie had a childhood like no other. Called Snow Baby by the Inuit who had never seen a blond blue-eyed child, she moved back and forth between the icy domains where her father kept camp as he continued his expeditions, and the U.S., where her mother’s relatives led a genteel life. Kirkpatrick had great source material to work with: both Marie and her mother wrote their own books. But her own involving writing gets this right down to a child’s level as she picks out the details that will appeal to them most: Christmas in arctic climes, a frightening ship wreck, her friendships with Inuit children. She wisely frames the youngster’s personal story against a larger one—the repeated struggles of her father to reach the North Pole. This book has everything—adventure, longing for a parent, the juxtaposition of cultures—all wrapped up in attractive package, studded with fabulous photographs. A solid bibliography and source notes for the quotes are appended.—Ray Olson, Starred Review, Booklist.

Redcoats and Petticoats

Redcoats and Petticoats

jacket

Redcoats and Petticoats
Illustrated by Ronald Himler
Holiday House
Ages 6 and up

A Junior Library Guild selection
Featured by Scholastic Book Clubs
Featured by the New York Times, Long Island section
Adapted for film and stage

“Gr. 3-5. First British soldiers arrested her father as a traitor, then the Redcoats took over the house. Soon after, 13-year-old Thomas Strong recalls, his mother moved the family to a small waterfront cottage and commenced such odd activities as hanging petticoats daily on the clothesline and sending Thomas rowing long distances in search of a whaleboat. So it was, unbeknownst to him, that young Thomas Strong participated in a spy ring during the Revolutionary War. Nancy Strong’s petticoats were a vital link in a spy chain that conveyed secret messages to General George Washington in Connecticut. Through Thomas’ first-person account, readers sense the humiliation suffered and the danger survived by the youth. Himler’s dramatic watercolors will engage readers, drawing them further into the story’s intrigue. Historical notes on the Strong family and its role in the Revolution, together with maps of the Long Island sites of action, complete this alluring glimpse at a fascinating episode in America’s past.”—Ellen Mandel, Booklist.

Mysterious Bones: The Story of Kennewick Man

Mysterious Bones: The Story of Kennewick Man


Mysterious Bones: The Story of Kennewick Man
Illustrated by Emma Stevenson

Holiday House

Ages 10 and up
Golden Kite Honor Book
Children’s Book Council / National Science Teachers Association Notable Trade Book
Washington State Book Award finalist
School Library Journal Best Book of the Year

This carefully researched, gracefully written, attractively formatted book explores the discovery of the 9000-year-old Paleoindian whose nearly complete skeletal remains caused an uproar in both scientific and Native American circles. Accompanied by superb gouache paintings done in warm ambers and golds with accents of black, the lucid text recounts the struggle of scientists to handle the bones and run specific DNA and carbon-dating experiments on them, all the while facing the outrage of Native American tribal groups envisioning another exploitation of ancestral remains. Lawsuits were set in motion under the auspices of the Native American Graves Protection and Reparation Act (NAGPRA), and the opposing sides battled for years before the scientists were given a moderate go-ahead to approach the bones in a monitored, respectful manner. Kirkpatrick’s measured tones record the early findings preceding the lawsuits and speculate on what the recent testing might reveal, also presenting data from other Paleoindian discoveries. Stevenson’s carefully detailed drawings echo the warmth of the dust jacket and keep perfect step with the informative pattern. Pair this title with Patricia Lauber’s Who Came First?: New Clues to Prehistoric Americans (National Geographic, 2003) to fuel fascinating discussions on the prehistoric settlement of the Americas. A sterling work of scholarly quality. —Patricia Manning (formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY), Starred Review, School Library Journal.

Escape Across the Wide Sea

Escape Across the Wide Sea

wide sea book coverEscape Across the Wide Sea

Holiday House
Ages 8-12

Lamplighter Award finalist

“Gr. 5-8—In 1686, nine-year-old Daniel Bonnet’s Huguenot family makes a desperate attempt to escape persecution in France. They board a ship that they believe will transport them to England. Instead, they have embarked on a three-year journey that takes them first to Africa, where the vessel takes on a cargo of slaves. Daniel’s leg wound from a French soldier’s bayonet renders him handicapped, yet he performs chores that lead him into the ship’s hold, where he meets Seynabou, a girl kidnapped into slavery. In Guadeloupe, he manages to bring her to the attention of a sugar plantation owner, who buys her. But even here, French colonial soldiers arrest Huguenots, and families and their slaves leave for New York, where they earn money to buy land and establish a community in New Rochelle. Kirkpatrick creates a strong sense of place, and the plot successfully comes full circle as the Bonnets return to their original trade as weavers. Full-page illustrations are scattered throughout. Back matter includes a pronunciation guide and glossary in English and French as well as a historical note that includes a passage about the real Daniel Bonnet. This strong historical novel presents a realistic account of slavery, religious intolerance, and French immigration in colonial times.”—Jean Gaffney, School Library Journal